Legal Update on the Captain Morgan Incident

This week aditus foundation, Jesuit Refugee Service Malta and Integra foundation filed three complaints in three different fora with respect to the situation of around 167 migrants currently being held aboard the private vessels Europa II and the Atlantis, just outside Malta’s territorial waters. The Maltese government chartered a number of private pleasure craft vessels to accommodate migrants rescued in Malta’s SAR zone in the period between the 28th and 29th April 2020 and 6th May 2020. The migrants were transferred from private and AFM vessels involved in the rescue to the chartered vessels and have remained there since the beginning of May.

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aditus foundation publishes its feedback on Malta’s Proposed Legislative Changes further to the Venice Commission Report on Malta

aditus foundation has presented its feedback on Malta’s Proposed Legislative Changes to the European Commission for Democracy through Law (Venice Commission) further to its Report on Malta published in 2018. aditus also had the opportunity to discuss its views on the proposed changes, together with other local civil society actors, with the rapporteurs of the Venice Commission.

As we have repeatedly underlined in all our advocacy efforts over the past years and in our communications with the Venice Commission and the European Parliament’s ad-hoc Delegation to Malta, our concerns are centred on a rights-based understanding of good governance, requiring a healthy and functioning rule of law to ensure the respect, protection and fulfillment of the fundamental rights of all persons living in Malta.

In our document we highlighted the importance of rolling out the much-needed reform, whilst also highlighting that any changes need to be part of a broader reform which takes into account the context of Malta’s political, media and civil society landscape that has shaped the reality that we live in today.

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Larger than Life! Online Gallery

In ‘Larger Than Life!’ we commissioned 6 human rights posters from established local artists: Ed DingliSarah Maria SciclunaMagda AzabSeb Tanti BurlóLuke CaruanaDaniela Attard. Our idea was to produce posters unlike our usual NGO poster. Instead, we wanted stunning artworks that happen to be posters grappling with a human rights theme.

PURCHASE YOUR POSTER:

These posters are now available for sale, with proceeds going towards our human rights work. The artworks come in 2 sizes and are perfect for filling up your home or office space!

  • Limited edition of 3: 1m x 0.7m, printed on FineArt Baryta paper (350gsm) @ €250
  • Limited edition of 25: A3, mounted on foamboard @ €25.

If you are interested in the artworks for your home or office, get in touch.


Born UN/equal
Seb Tanti Burló

Article 1 – All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

This article sets the tone for the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights. It’s a nice boomer belief, but seventy years later it is very, very, very far from our reality. Just look around you.

Born UN/equal is a riff off of Philip Castle’s famous poster design for Stanley Kubrick’s film Full Metal Jacket.


Remembrance
Sarah Maria Scicluna


This work is a memorial for all those who lost their lives crossing the Mediterranean Sea, in support of all those who have lost family and friends in such tragedies. While newspapers and official reports mostly focus on statistics of lost lives, many times the people left grieving are forgotten and left without a place for mourning.


This work is done line-by-line in a very repetitive manner, which is representative of both the surface of the sea and the ever-rising tally numbers.


Architects of our destiny
Magda Azab

Despite close to 100 years having passed since the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, rights that seem obvious to me are unfortunately not always guaranteed for everyone in this world.

Wondering which aspects to highlight, I decided to represent what I think they all have in common and make them fundamental, namely to guarantee us the possibility of being architects of our destiny and none of us should be denied that. We are all human beings worthy of happiness and justice regardless of where we’re born, of our cultures, customs, lifestyles or religions.


Global Injustice
Luke Caruana

The wealthiest and most developed countries in the world are largely to blame for the cataclysmic effects of climate change. However, as we have already seen, these countries are not the ones that will suffer the most from these drastic weather changes. It is the impoverished countries that are facing the gravest consequences. Ecological disasters and poor harvests are increasing inequality and political instability.

The melting globe interprets the climate injustice we are experiencing as the rich (Global North) are able to buy their way out of the climate crisis while the poor (Global South) are forgotten.


The Promised Land
Ed Dingli

Entire lives left behind. Moments, memories, families, friends left behind. There is no choice except to make the journey to the promised land. We can see it so clearly now, on the horizon. The human rights declaration a beacon of hope, our moral compass by which the ship should sail. Except, between us and safety, a few more obstacles to overcome. The sea, in all its power and unpredictability, the coast guards, whose side will they be on?

And the locals, our new neighbours, will they welcome us? Will they understand our ways, our language, our culture? Hopefully they will understand that all we want, is to be safe.


27
Daniela Attard

Article 27 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights states that “everyone has the right freely to participate in the cultural life of the community, to enjoy the arts and to share in scientific advancement and its benefits.”

In this digital piece we explore visually the interconnectivity of the arts, culture and sciences and their ability to grow and flourish in any community. That is, given that anyone and everyone is allowed to participate and contribute.


With the support of:

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(Ir)Regular Love Campaign

Everyone who is old enough has the right to marry, no matter who they are or where they are from, this is guaranteed by the European Convention on Human Rights and the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights.

However, not everyone has access to this right and many migrants that do not have a Maltese residence permit or a valid visa still face a number of barriers when wishing to contract a marriage with their partners, be they Maltese or foreign, even though Maltese law does not require Maltese residency in order to marry.

This is our campaign to raise awareness on their right to marry:

(Ir)Regular Love Campaign video

Follow our News & Updates or email [email protected] to get to know more!


This project has been funded by the Small Initiatives Support Scheme (SIS) managed by the Malta Council for the Voluntary Sector (MCVS)

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Watch the dividing line between maintaining public order and eating away at fundamental freedoms!

The current climate in Malta risks being pushed towards a scenario that disregards a series of fundamental freedoms. Over the past days we have witnessed Government behaviour that has progressively eaten away at those freedoms that are fundamental to the healthy functioning of a democratic society. We are therefore seriously concerned that, if continued unchecked, such behaviour will cross the dividing line between permissible Government interventions to maintain public law and order, and actions amounting to human rights violations.

We appreciate that in fulfilling its duty to protect all persons in Malta, the Government is empowered to take actions it deems necessary. We also fully acknowledge the challenges presented to the Government by large demonstrations of the kind that have been occurring on an almost daily basis outside key institutions: the Prime Minister’s office, Parliament House and the Law Courts.

Yet we feel it is necessary to remind the Government that demonstrations and public expressions of opinions, aligned or opposed to Government’s own views, are an integral part of functioning and strong democracies. That any action taken by the Government to curtail, limit or deprive anyone from exercising their fundamental human rights must occur within the very strict limits imposed by law. That the rights to freedom of expression and freedom of peaceful assembly are solidly enshrined in Malta’s Constitution. That they are also present in internal human rights instruments creating binding legal obligations on Malta, such as the European Convention on Human rights, the European Unions’ Fundamental Right Charter and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.

We therefore express full solidarity with members of media organisations who were locked in the Prime Minister’s Office by unidentified men. We strongly denounce the verbal and physical attacks on journalists by Government employees. We flag, as an act of direct provocation, the relentless shrinking of public demonstration space in Freedom Square where Parliament House is located. We unequivocally condemn as false and inflammatory public statements by Government officials that demonstrators are intent on causing bloodshed. We stress that statements made by Government officials, describing civil society organisations as political party tools, are unfounded and made with an intent to stir up hatred and further unrest.

We finally stress that the on-going peaceful demonstrations, in which we are actively and proudly participating, are a national call of justice and accountability. Until the nation and its institutions embark on a path of truth and justice, the people will insist on exercising their fundamental rights of free expression and free peaceful assembly.

We therefore urge Government to refrain from any act that could unduly interfere with the exercise of these rights. We alert the Government to the possibility that any acts or words of provocation on their part could result in serious consequences and civil unrest.