Together, we remember Lassana Cisse Souleymane, whose life was so callously taken away.

On the evening of the 6th April,  Lassana Cisse Souleymane was murdered in Hal Far. Two other men were also victims in this attack. 

Lassana’s life mattered. He mattered to his family, to his friends, and he mattered to us. Such brutal acts of violence cannot and must not be ignored or silenced.

Together, we remember Lassana Cisse Souleymane, whose life was so callously taken away.

We stand in solidarity with our brothers and sisters who continue to experience violence, who do not feel safe.

We stand in condemnation of racism and wanton acts of hatred.

We encourage everyone to come together to denounce this act of violence.

We call upon the Maltese Police Force to commit all necessary resources to bring the perpetrators to justice.

We call upon Maltese authorities to ensure that all members of Maltese society feel respected, safe and protected.


Lassana Cisse Souleymane, brutally murdered on 6 April 2019.

Statement endorsed by:

  1. aditus foundation
  2. African Media Association
  3. Allied Rainbow Communities
  4. ARTfuLIFE
  5. Association des Ivoiriens a Malte
  6. Blue Door English
  7. Catholic Voices Malta
  8. Caritas Malta
  9. Chaplaincy, University of Malta
  10. Church Homes for the Elderly
  11. Christian Life Community (CLC) Malta
  12. Cross Culture International Foundation
  13. Dar Hosea
  14. Dar tal-Providenza
  15. Department for Inclusion and Access to Learning, University of Malta
  16. Department of Social Policy and Social Work, University of Malta
  17. Drachma LGBTI
  18. Drachma Parents Group
  19. Eritrean Community, Malta
  20. Fondazzjoni Paci u Gid – Peace and Good Foundation
  21. Fondazzjoni Sebh
  22. Foundation for Shelter and Support to Migrants
  23. International Association For Refugees
  24. International Integrity Foundation
  25. Isles of the Left
  26. Hal Far Outreach
  27. Integra Foundation
  28. Jesuit Refugee Service Malta
  29. Kopin
  30. Kummissjoni Ġustizzja u Paċi
  31. Malta Emigrants Commission
  32. Malta Humanist Association
  33. Malta Microfinance
  34. Malta Association for the Counselling Profession
  35. Malta LGBTIQ Rights Movement
  36. Malta Street Art Collective
  37. Maltese Association of Social Workers
  38. Men Against Violence
  39. Migrant Offshore Aid Station
  40. Migrant Women Association Malta
  41. Millennium Chapel
  42. Mina Tolu
  43. Moviment Graffitti
  44. Paolo Freire Institute
  45. People for Change Foundation
  46. Pete Farrugia
  47. Platform for Human Rights Organizations in Malta
  48. Prof. Andrew Azzopardi, Office of the Dean of the Faculty for Social Wellbeing
  49. Department of Youth and Community Studies
  50. Richmond Foundation
  51. Salesians of Don Bosco
  52. Segratarjat Assistenza Socjali tal-Azzjoni Kattolika Maltija
  53. Society of Jesus Malta (Jesuits)
  54. Solidarity with Migrants
  55. SOS Malta
  56. Spark 15
  57. St. Jeanne Antide Foundation
  58. Sudanese Community Malta
  59. The Association for Justice, Equality and Peace
  60. The Critical Institute
  61. The Good Shepherd Sisters – Dar Merhba Bik Foundation
  62. The National Foster Care Association Malta
  63. The Peace Lab
  64. Umberto Buttigieg
  65. UNHCR Malta
  66. Victim Support Malta
  67. Women’s Rights Foundation
  68. YMCA
  69. Youth Alive Foundation



Inciting hostility against members of a particular faith cannot be accepted as legitimate!

We, the undersigned non-governmental organisations, are gravely concerned by the decision of the Magistrate’s Court in the case against Brandon Bartolo. We feel it gives a message that it is not only an acceptable, but also a legitimate exercise of the right to freedom of expression, to express strong anti-Muslim sentiments and to state that members of this religious faith have no place in Malta.

We are also deeply upset that comments made by the Magistrate in delivering judgement, as reported in the local media, were irrelevant, populist and also factually incorrect. In expressing those views, the Magistrate essentially condoned anti-migrant sentiment instead of upholding the human rights values our Courts of Laws are intended to promote.

Bartolo had written “Tmur tihdu fox kemm anda … awnhekk edin pajjizna .. ahna religjon wihed biss … huma guests iridu jimxu al ligijiet tagna … ma jogobomx??

Fuck off back to your country!”

It is extremely worrying that one of the highest authorities in the country condones the use of such hostile and denigrating language against anyone, particularly when it is because of a personal identity characteristic such as religion, sexual orientation, gender, disability or their race.

Condoning such behaviour risks undermining not only the rights of members of the group directly targeted, but also the right of each and every one of us to be treated with respect, regardless of who we are or what we believe in.

While it is true that the law protects the right to freedom of expression and, to some extent, the right to offend, this freedom is by no means absolute. In fact, the European Convention on Human Rights specifically states that the Convention should not be interpreted as allowing anyone, be it the government or an individual, to behave in a way aimed at the destruction of the rights and freedoms laid down in the Convention.

In a case similar to the present one (Norwood v. The United Kingdom), the Court said that “a general, vehement attack against a religious group…is incompatible with the values proclaimed and guaranteed by the Convention, notably tolerance, social peace and non-discrimination”.

Statements which clearly incite hostility against members of a particular faith, and violate the prohibition on discrimination and the right to freedom of conscience and religion, cannot and should not be accepted as legitimate in a democratic society founded on respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms.

Such tirades do not only damage, annoy and offend the individual concerned, they also run counter to and undermine the values on which we claim our society is based.


This statement is issued by:

aditus foundation, The Critical Institute, Drachma LGBTI, Drachma Parents Group, Integra Foundation, International Association for Refugees , Jesuit Refugee Service (Malta), KOPIN, Malta LGBTIQ Rights Movement (MGRM), Migrant Women Association Malta, National Foster Care Association, Platform of Human Rights Organisations in Malta (PHROM), SOS Malta, Troup 18:45, Women’s Rights Foundation.


We would like to commend the Government of Malta’s stand against the far right group Defend Europe

Photo from independent.co.uk

We would like to commend the Government of Malta’s stand against the far right group Defend Europe in refusing to allow the C-Star to enter Malta.

Under the deceptive premise of ‘saving lives’, the mission of the vessel C-Star claims to ‘defend Europe’ by disrupting humanitarian vessels and by returning refugees to the coast of Libya.

The scope and actions of Defend Europe must not be underestimated, their political ideology is dangerous and extreme.

The stance adopted by the Government of Malta sends out a clear message against the politics of hate and extremism.

Statement of:

aditus foundation, Graffiti,  Integra Foundation, Jesuit Refugee Service (Malta), Kopin, The Critical Institute.


Which blood colour do you prefer?

aditus science in the city

Which blood colour do you prefer?

On 30 September our installation threw pop culture, provocation, and art together to discuss and challenge racism. ‘Colourism Haemophobia: Blood colour complexion’ took place in Valletta at Café Society during Science in the City 2016, the Science night festival—European Researchers’ Night.

The event is supported by the European Commission’s Research and Innovation Framework Programme Horizon 2020 (H2020, 2014–2020) by the Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions. Valletta was transformed with interactive exhibitions, artworks, music, talks and live experiments; it hosted science-fun activities for children and young teens, and science and arts workshops.

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Our idea was to create an anti-racist message that could also be used to promote the blood donations. We played with two different concepts:

  • Colourism, discrimination based on skin colour;
  • Haemophobia, a pathological fear of blood.

Our installation presented the tendency to perceive and behave toward members of a racial category based on the lightness or darkness of their skin tone, with the underlying message that skin colour is quite literally skin deep.

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It was a success and a lot of people interacted with the installation, during a pre-dinner drink or a beer later with the sea views at Café’ Society making it the perfect setting for our artwork.

The festival is organised by the University of Malta, Malta Chamber of Scientists and the Research Trust of the University of Malta, in partnership with Jugs Malta, Studio 7, MEUSAC, MCST, Valletta Local Council, Malta College for Arts, Science and Technology, PBS, Notte Bianca, Spazju Kreativ, and General Soft Drinks with Coca Cola.

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Blood, art, racism, science: what are we up to?

On 30 September we’ll be participating in Science in the City 2016 with an installation that challenges stereotypes and invites reflection on diversity.

The ‘Science in the City—European Researchers’ Night’ festival, is organised by the University of Malta, the Research Trust of the University of Malta and the Malta Chamber of Scientists together with a large number of partners. Funded by the European Commission’s Research and Innovation Framework Programme H2020 (2014-2020) by the Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions, it is recognized as a ‘festival’ by Europe for Festivals and Festivals for Europe (EFFE).

It is supported by Parliamentary Secretary for Research, Innovation, Youth & Sport, General Soft Drinks and a number of corporate sponsors.

Entitled ‘Colourism|Haemophobia’, our installation playfully uses blood in order to immerse viewers in questions about identity, prejudice, social cohesion and community.

Essentially, our installation promotes the value of equal human dignity as a fundamental principle and guiding social norm.

The ‘blind’ solidarity expressed when donating blood is a perfect context to underline the need for us to be ‘blind’ to skin colour, and to embrace the common humanity we all share.


Want to know more? Follow the Science in the City programme (regularly updated) for details on our installation’s location…

 

…and we’ll see you there!

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